About

Shortly after moving to Germany in 2006, I had the extraordinary luck to meet the most amazing woman in the world.  Oh yeah, she also happened to be German.  Two years later we added our son to the mix, and after marveling at the differences in our own family for a few years Germerican Denglish was born.

This is a blog about the adventures that we go through living in a multinational family and raising a bilingual child, some serious and some funny. Well, we think some of it is funny anyway. I would say we are caught between two cultures, but I think instead that we get the best of both worlds.  Hopefully the stories from our life, and random observations by me, will be interesting and/or entertaining for you.  If not, then I apologize in advance for torturing you.

What started as a culture & language blog is gradually expanding to include among other things, soccer.  The reason I have decided to include soccer is that becoming a fan of “the Beautiful Game” is one of the major changes that I underwent after moving to Germany.  I am also passionate about it’s popularity increase in the US, so if I can assist that in any way at all I am more than happy to help.  America just doesn’t know what it’s missing!

22 thoughts on “About

      1. Hi! Just found your blog. We are also a German-American couple with a Germerican son. It’s funny, we have always called him that since I was pregnant, but had yet to hear/see anyone else use it!

      2. Hi, we always enjoy finding other German/American couples. We hadn’t ever heard Germerican used before either, but it hits the nail on the head. Good luck with your move!

  1. I love your blog name and tag line. Funny! In my family, I’m the American and my husband is the German. I am going to have to tell him about your terminology, especially how it pertains to the “language” your son speaks. Our kids are in the same boat.

      1. I guess that depends on your definition of fluent, lol. No, conversationally I am pretty fluent though, enough that I converse with the family freely and go shopping and such without much trouble. Also, my wife and I converse exclusively in our native language. My der, die, das are not good unfortunately. That is our fault though, we didn’t make a point of me learning the article with the word while practicing vocabulary.

      2. That’s great that you can communicate conversationally. Definitely a long-term goal for me, and one that does not include der, die, das 🙂

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